GMWS Blog

Waldorf Education in Today's New York Times

Take a look at this Room for Debate piece in The New York Times that includes Beverly Amico, Leader of Outreach and Development for AWSNA, the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America.

The Third Metric

Arianna Huffington of The Huffington Post has been promoting her book, Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder with recent blog posts and radio interviews.

In this related article, Waldorf math teacher Lisa Babinet  highlights the importance of not only preparing students academically but also "preparing the students for a life of well-being, wisdom, wonder, and giving". This is the gift of Waldorf® Education.

Screen-Free Week: May 5-11

The amazing Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (whose founder, Dr. Susan Linn, spoke at Green Meadow last week), started Screen-Free Week in 1994, as "TV-Free America".

We are celebrating Screen-Free Week by staying off Facebook, Twitter, and our blog, and interacting with screens only as needed for work. Visit the Screen-Free Week website or read this article for inspiration.

See you on May 12!

Dr. Susan Linn at GMWS next Tuesday

April 29, 7:30pm in the Arts Building Music Room, free and open to the public:

The Gift of a Commercial-Free Childhood, with Dr. Susan Linn, a sought-after speaker, co-founder and director of The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC), and an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

An award-winning producer, writer, and puppeteer, Dr. Linn is the author of The Case for Make Believe: Saving Play in a Commercialized World, and Consuming Kids: The Hostile Takeover of Childhood and lectures internationally on reclaiming childhood from corporate marketers.

At Dr. Linn's request, this talk will not be videotaped for our website, so don't miss the live event!  

The Documented Life

As we prepare for winter break and time with family, let's consider this opinion piece by Dr. Sherry Turkle of MIT, from The New York Times.

One of the best quotes: "It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection."

Alone Together

Sherry Turkle, author of Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other, has been on our radar for some time. A professor at MIT and one of the first academics to study the impact of emerging technology on adults' and children's behavior, her April 2012 TED talk was followed by this interview last week with Bill Moyers. Hers is an important perspective.

Here's a quote: “What concerns me as a developmental psychologist is watching children grow in this new world where being bored is something that never has to be tolerated for a moment,” Turkle tells Moyers. “Everyone is always having their attention divided between the world of people [they're] with and this ‘other’ reality.”

 

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