GMWS Blog

Teaching 21st Century Skills

Watch this video through to the end (15 well-spent minutes). At about minute 13.5, Lichtman shares three principles for schools: Teach into the Unknown, Develop Self-Evolving Learners, and Be a Self-Evolving Organization. These three principles align perfectly with Green Meadow's mission, and it's exciting to see alignment between mainstream thinking and the wisdom of Waldorf.

Different language, similar ideas
At GMWS, we understand that Waldorf Education prepares students not for the world of today but for the world they will enter when they graduate, the world of tomorrow (Lichtman's "teaching into the unknown").

In our materials, we have used the phrase "lifelong learners" (akin to Lichtman's "self-evolving learners").

And we are committed, through faculty training and regular self-reflection and accreditation processes, to being an evolving organization that changes to meet the needs of the students in our care.

Why Young Kids Learn Through Movement

This is a terrific article from The Atlantic. One of our favorite quotes: "Research has shown time and again that children need opportunities to move in class. Memory and movement are linked, and the body is a tool of learning, not a roadblock to or a detour away from it."

This Sunday, March 13: Film Screening

Sunday's forecast is rain, so why not join us for a film screening? 2pm, Arts Building Music Room, free & open to the public.  Discussion after the screening with Wally Glickman, filmmaker and Professor of Physics at LIU Brooklyn. 

 


This Saturday, March 5: A Morning in the Nursery/Kindergarten

Join us from 9:30-11am with your child(ren) and experience a typical morning in the Early Childhood program. Please register with Barbara Mann, 845.356.2514 x326.

New Slideshow about the Kindergarten

Take a look! Green Meadow’s Early Childhood programs foster the foundations of academic excellence. Our Early Childhood teachers provide the young child with a warm, beautiful, loving, home-like environment, which is protective and secure, where the day unfolds in a predictable, regular way. The children are given a range of activities and the structure they need to prepare for the next phase of school life.

Tomorrow night (November 3): Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools

Please join us!

Dr. Howard Stevenson: Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools
7:30pm, Arts Building Music Room
Free and open to the public. 

Based on extensive research, Dr. Stevenson’s work explores how schools are often places where racial conflicts remain hidden, at the expense of a healthy school climate and the wellbeing of students of color.

Dr. Howard Stevenson is the Constance Clayton Professor of Urban Education, Professor of Africana Studies, and former Chair of the Applied Psychology and Human Development Division, in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania.

Can Learning to Knit Help Students Learn to Code?

This article shows the kind of interdisiplinary thinking that Waldorf students are developing throughout their education. And the photo below shows our Fifth Graders helping our First Graders learn to knit. (Photo courtesy of First Grade teacher Mellie Lonnemann.)


Raising 'Good' Kids

As we spend more time with our children this summer, let's remember these six principles.

How Playing Music Benefits Your Brain More Than Any Other Activity

Green Meadow students play an instrument from third through twelfth grades. This article highlights some of the neurological benefits. We know there are many other benefits as well, both tangible and intangible.

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