Can Learning to Knit Help Students Learn to Code?

This article shows the kind of interdisiplinary thinking that Waldorf students are developing throughout their education. And the photo below shows our Fifth Graders helping our First Graders learn to knit. (Photo courtesy of First Grade teacher Mellie Lonnemann.)

Raising 'Good' Kids

As we spend more time with our children this summer, let's remember these six principles.

A Strong Trust in Children's Abilities

This piece from The Washington Post is worth reading. Our favorite quote: "I also believe that competence can only be gained through experience; therefore, allowing our children to take risks will actually make them safer. Behind this philosophy is a strong trust in children’s abilities in general; I often feel that we don’t give children enough credit in this area."

The Indefatigable PolyGnomes

Our Robotics Team, the indefatigable PolyGnomes, has worked incredibly hard this year and has advanced to the FTC World Championships in St. Louis. They leave on April 21 to compete for three days against the best teams in the world, and they are the only Waldorf school participating at this level, in this championship.

We hope you will consider helping to fund their trip, in honor of their tremendous efforts and their strong spirit.

This video shows you what their robot, #28, can do.

Parenting Advice From "America’s Worst Mom"

This recent piece from The New York Times reminds us of the importance of letting our children have experiences that build their resilience and self-confidence.

A salient quote: "Dr. Gray links the astronomical rise in childhood depression and anxiety disorders, which are five to eight times more common than they were in the 1950s, to the decline in free play among young children. 'Young people today are less likely to have a sense of control over their own lives and more likely to feel they are the victims of circumstances, which is predictive of anxiety and depression,' he said."

Study Suggests that Freedom Improves Creativity

This article from Psychology Today looks at a 2012 study documenting a continuous decline in creativity among American schoolchildren over the last two or three decades. The research suggests that play and curiosity are foundations for learning. They are also the bedrock of Waldorf Education.

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