GMWS Blog

A New Film by Alumnus Stefan Schaefer '89

Take a look at this video conversation with Stefan Schaefer '89, who made "Even Though the Whole World is Burning", which screens at GMWS on July 15.

Tickets are available here.

How Playing Music Benefits Your Brain More Than Any Other Activity

Green Meadow students play an instrument from third through twelfth grades. This article highlights some of the neurological benefits. We know there are many other benefits as well, both tangible and intangible.

The PolyGnomes at the World Championships

The Green Meadow robotics team, The PolyGnomes, traveled to the FTC World Championships from April 21-26 and left tied for 5th place, out of 4500 teams. We are so proud of their accomplishments, and grateful to their coaches, math teachers James Madsen and Lisa Krogh!

Here they are, practicing at the tournament:

 

 

 

The Indefatigable PolyGnomes

Our Robotics Team, the indefatigable PolyGnomes, has worked incredibly hard this year and has advanced to the FTC World Championships in St. Louis. They leave on April 21 to compete for three days against the best teams in the world, and they are the only Waldorf school participating at this level, in this championship.

We hope you will consider helping to fund their trip, in honor of their tremendous efforts and their strong spirit.

This video shows you what their robot, #28, can do.

What Are Schools For?

This recent article from The Boston Globe reminds us that part of the responsibility of schools is to help young people develop non-academic skills.

Support the GMWS PolyGnomes Robotics Team!


Our Robotics Team is headed to Scranton, PA on March 19 to compete in Super Regionals. Help them get there!

Parenting Advice From "America’s Worst Mom"

This recent piece from The New York Times reminds us of the importance of letting our children have experiences that build their resilience and self-confidence.

A salient quote: "Dr. Gray links the astronomical rise in childhood depression and anxiety disorders, which are five to eight times more common than they were in the 1950s, to the decline in free play among young children. 'Young people today are less likely to have a sense of control over their own lives and more likely to feel they are the victims of circumstances, which is predictive of anxiety and depression,' he said."

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