School Events

Registration Open for New Public After-School Classes!

For the first time in our nearly 70-year history, Green Meadow Waldorf School is offering after-school classes that are open to the public. Beginning the week of September 10, 2018, all classes take place on our 11-acre wooded campus in Chestnut Ridge, in Rockland County, NY (just three miles from Bergen County, NJ). Courses are run by teachers, parents, and friends of our school.

These classes are designed to offer students opportunities to stretch their minds and bodies while they develop new skills and friendships.

Classes offered include: Activism/Civics, Capoiera, Circus Arts, Cooking, Culinary Arts, Fiber Craft, Gardening, Jewelry, KEVA Planks: The Making of an Architect!, Making Herbal Remedies and Products, Photography, Textile Design and Sewing, Theater Arts, and Woodworking.

Click here for the full brochure and here for the program webpage.

For more information and to register, please contact the teacher(s) of the class(es) that interest you. Contact information for each teacher is listed in the brochure.

For general program information, please contact Vicki Larson, Director of Communications and Marketing, 845.356.2514 x311 or vlarson@gmws.org.

Photos from today's Senior Projects

Join us this week for Senior Projects! (Full schedule here.) 

Two of today's highlights were Quilting by Sophia Dunn-Fox and Millinery by Miana Johnson. 

Quilt by Sophia Dunn-Fox '18

Quilt by Sophia Dunn-Fox '18

This photo & two below: hats by Miana Johnson '18.

This photo & two below: hats by Miana Johnson '18.

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Senior Projects are coming up!

Senior projects are a beloved Green Meadow tradition, in which each 12th grader presents on a topic they have been immersed in, independently, for a full year. See the full 2018 Senior Projects schedule.

See excerpts and full senior projects from 2017 on our YouTube channel.

Friendship Games this Friday and Saturday, 1/26 and 1/27

Join us for the Friendship Games, our annual middle-school basketball tournament! We are excited to host the following Waldorf schools from our region: Baltimore, Brooklyn, Great Barrington, Kimberton, Steiner, and Washington.

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Celebrate the Seasons with a Waldorf Teacher

Join us on Saturday, December 9 from 10:30am-12pm for a special seasonal event. Spend time in our beautiful cozy classroom on a cold December morning, while children play and adults have time for conversation. We will make felted acorns and learn some verses about Little Jackie Frost and King Winter. We'll also share a bowl of warm oatmeal together. Slow down, connect with new friends, and allow your little ones some time for an unhurried, magical morning.

Please register with Barbara Mann at 845.356.2514 x326 or bmann@gmws.org.

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Photos from the Rose Ceremony (Sept. 2017)

The Rose Ceremony is a beloved tradition at many Waldorf schools, including Green Meadow. On the first day of school in September, the 12th graders welcome the 1st graders into the school by handing them a rose. On the last day of school, the (now taller, older, and wiser) 1st graders reciprocate and say goodbye to the 12th graders with a rose of their own. The whole school gathers to witness both events.

Last week's Rose Ceremony took place on Sept. 6 and was, as always, a beautiful and moving rite of passage for all of our young people.

Photos by Fernando Lopez

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Follow us on social media

We post frequently on social media (Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter primarily) and we invite you to follow us to see photos, articles, news, and event announcements that are often not posted elsewhere. Please also use the hashtag #GMWS when you post photos of any GMWS events.

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The Class of 2017 Commencement

 

Green Meadow Waldorf School's Class of 2017 will celebrate commencement this Sunday, June 18 at 11am, in Rose Hall, in our Arts Building.

The 22 students in the class return today from their class trip to Vieques, Puerto Rico, and begin preparing tomorrow for the ceremony.

For their Senior Projects, one student built a tiny house, another wrote a novel, a third studied midwifery (attending two births alongside a Certified Nurse Midwife). Others researched and presented on Finance and Investing, Politics, Photo Journalism, and more. All the presentations are available on the school's YouTube channel.

We are so proud of this class. Many of the students have attended our school since Kindergarten, and those who joined in later years have enriched the class greatly. We are so pleased at who they have become and all they have accomplished, as a class and as individuals.

Students were accepted to schools including Cornell University, Mount Holyoke College, Sarah Lawrence College, Hampshire College, Kenyon College, Skidmore College, and the prestigious Commerce Program at Queen's University in Canada.

The full Class of 2017 College Acceptance List can be found here.

Congratulations, seniors!

Senior Projects Make the News!

Matt Olson '17 built a tiny house to donate to a family or organization in need for his senior project. Here's a short video and article about Matt's project.

Congratulations to Matt and all our seniors! Watch clips of senior project presentations.

Senior Project Presentations, April 3-6

Senior Projects are a hallmark of many Waldorf schools and a beloved tradition at Green Meadow. All seniors conceive their own independent senior project in May of their junior year, and then work with an outside mentor as well as a faculty mentor throughout their senior year until their school presentation in April. Join us for this memorable and moving week.

This year’s Senior Projects include Building a House, Photojournalism, Midwifery, Finance, Writing a Novel, Fashion Design, Roller Derby, SCUBA diving, and Luthier Training.

Hear directly from four seniors about their experience: take a look at pages 14 and 15 of the March/April issue of The Bulletin.

Click here for specific presentation times during Senior Projects week.

This Saturday, 3/25: It's About Time! Benefit to launch our endowment

This year, we are focusing on establishing our first endowment; hence the name of our fundraiser: “It’s About Time: A Benefit for Our First Endowment.” The proceeds from our benefit will begin planting perennial seeds and establish a foundation to grow upon. An endowment is a permanent fund in which the principal is held in perpetuity and only the investment income is expended annually – providing a permanent, long-term source of funding. Endowed funds support activities not just for one year, or even one generation, but forever! Funds are invested prudently to ensure they can sustain current and future needs.

A healthy endowment will provide strength, longevity, creativity, and flexibility for Green Meadow, ensuring steady income to support key programs and invest in new ideas.

Buy tickets here (before Saturday 3/25).

Bid in the online auction. (Closes at 10:30pm on Saturday 3/25)

An Interview with Anna Silber

We are looking forward to The Essentials of Waldorf Education with Anna Silber on Tuesday, December 6 at 7:30pm in the Arts Building Music Room. Anna is a GMWS parent, a former Class Teacher at Green Meadow, and now serves as Director of Education at Sunbridge Institute. We caught up with her this week and asked her to share a few things with us prior to the talk.

In a few sentences, what makes Waldorf Education unique?

There are many things Waldorf is known for that are viewed broadly as excellent educational practices, but are not necessarily what make it unique, like teacher looping, experiential learning, and artistic expression, to name a few. To discover why it is unique, though, we need to strip away what we take for granted as the "tangibles" of Waldorf Education and look at the "intangibles:" the view of child development out of anthroposophy, for one. We also need to shift the conversation from what we teach to why, how, and when we teach it.

How did you decide to become a Waldorf teacher?

I was enjoying a career as an analyst in an investment firm in Manhattan and had been studying anthroposophy as a spiritual path for several years. Out of personal interest, I took a tour through the Rudolf Steiner School on the Upper East Side and was deeply moved; I simply knew it was something with which I had to be involved. As cliche as it may sound, it had to do with a wish to contribute in a potent way to changing the world, and I had never seen anything so potent as the work being done in a Waldorf school! 

I quit my job two months later and enrolled as a teacher training student at Sunbridge, then took a class teaching position at Green Meadow, bringing my class from fourth through eighth grade. After that I became a mother, and I'm now a GMWS parent.

As a trained Class Teacher, how do you answer a parent who wonders about teacher looping? How do teachers manage the challenges and personality conflicts that may arise between teacher and student when accompanying a class for 4-8 years? 

The short answer is that we believe a team of teachers accompanying a group of students for a number of years offers many important benefits to a class community and to individual students. The challenges of human relationships are inevitable in life, and certainly school life is no exception. A commitment to looping is successful when it is coupled with an equal commitment to the hard work of tending to relationships with students, parents, and colleagues.

One of our main concerns in educating Waldorf teachers is equipping them with tools to navigate these very human challenges out of love, not power, not fear. We need to approach our students a bit like parents think of their own children in this particular sense: parents don't ask whether they like their children or not; they love them. Teachers in a looping situation can embody the same disposition; our job is to educate through love. That in itself is a whole separate topic which I will take up more fully in the upcoming talk. 


As Director of Education at Sunbridge Institute, what do you feel are the most important things a Waldorf teacher needs to learn in preparation for taking a class?

Part of the preparation is what teachers need to learn, and the other part is who they are or are becoming. I'll take as a given the obvious list of grade level skills and competencies that are required, and go right to the ideas about child development out of anthroposophy. It is the ongoing interest in and digestion of this paradigm that will guide and illuminate a teacher's work with her or his students.

In our teacher education program, we spend a lot of time exploring this theme, along with curriculum work, the arts, and anthroposophical studies. There is of course a long list of human qualities that makes for good teachers, as well as good human beings, like humor, imagination, flexibility, and interest in the world. However, these are qualities you can't teach someone; they are developed, and freely developed at that, if they are to be authentic. As Steiner said to the early Waldorf teachers, it's not just what you know, it's who you are that matters.